While some young people believe marijuana use has little-to-no effect on driving ability, a new study found that marijuana use impairs driving similar to alcohol use. The study, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Office on National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), was released this week and published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Ohio’s Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers in a new study released this week urged state leaders to put child safety requirements in place when considering marijuana legalization because more and more young children have access to the drug, especially through baked goods.

Marijuana plus alcohol is one of the most frequently detected drug combinations in car crashes nationwide, yet the interaction of these two compounds has been poorly understood…until now.

Canadian Researchers may have found a way to prevent, reduce or delay cannabis use amongst some at-risk youth.

"Marijuana use is highly prevalent among teenagers in North America and Europe," said Dr. Patricia Conrod, who led the study, in a news release. "As attitudes and laws towards marijuana are changing, it is important to find ways to prevent and reduce its use amongst at-risk youth. Our study reveals that targeted, brief interventions by trained teachers can achieve that goal."

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. This old adage worked for the Troy Drug Free Community Coalition in Troy, New York. The “Collar City,” near the state’s Capitol, had experienced a surge of criminal and gang activity, and the last straw was a local problem with synthetic marijuana. A neighborhood action committee was formed. They sought Drug-Free Communities Support Program funding. Twice rejected, the coalition submitted their application again and are now successfully implementing their initiatives as a Year One DFC grantee.

The Working Together: A Coalition for Safe and Healthy Communities has taken the words “working together” literally. The Minnesota coalition, headquartered in Pine River, Minn., decided to change its approach to collaboration and has increased its capacity and even after losing its Drug Free Communities funding, has implemented strategies for its sustainability.

Provides up-to-date, accurate information that will be useful to renew prevention and intervention efforts against marijuana.

A new study examined the relationship between marijuana and alcohol use, finding that simultaneous users had double the odds of participating in high-risk behavior such as impaired driving, social consequences and harm to self.

Results will be published in the May 2015 online-only issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Counseling, rather than school suspension, was found to be a more effective means of combating marijuana use in schools, a new study found.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Washington and in Australia, compared drug policies at schools in Washington state and Victoria, Australia, to determine how they impacted student marijuana use. The results were published online in the American Journal of Public Health.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. This old adage worked for the Troy Drug Free Community Coalition in Troy, New York. The “Collar City,” near the state’s Capitol, had experienced a surge of criminal and gang activity, and the last straw was a local problem with synthetic marijuana. A neighborhood action committee was formed. They sought Drug-Free Communities Support Program funding. Twice rejected, the coalition submitted their application again and are now successfully implementing their initiatives as a Year One DFC grantee.

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