The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has a cauldron of Halloween-related resources to assist your coalition’s impaired driving prevention efforts for Halloween.

From talking points, to op-eds, web videos, and social media posts, NHTSA offers these free materials to your coalition to help you spread the word about drunk and drugged driving.

The campaign is based on two basic principles:

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over (enforcement), and Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving (social norming).

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has a cauldron of Halloween-related resources to assist your coalition’s impaired driving prevention efforts around Halloween.

From talking points, to op-eds, web videos, and social media posts, NHTSA offers these free materials to your coalition to help you spread the word about drunk and drugged driving.

The campaign is based on two basic principles:

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over (enforcement), and Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving (social norming).

Drug use by drivers is a mounting concern, particularly in light of more permissive marijuana laws (now legal for medical use in D.C. and 23 states and recreational use in four states and D.C.) and an increase in prescription drug abuse (the amount of prescription painkillers dispensed in the U.S. has quadrupled since 1999). Any drug – whether illegal, filled by a prescription, or over-the-counter – can impair a person’s ability to safely operate a vehicle.

Did you know that The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) National Teen Driver Safety Week is Oct. 18-24?

A new study by public health researchers at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development found that the severity of the problem within the state is not the most important predictor of whether states adopt new laws to restrict drunk driving - nor is the political makeup of the state government. Instead, the two strongest predictors of states adopting their first drunk driving laws were having a large population of young people and a neighboring state with similar driving laws.

Your coalition is invited to implement the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)’s national impaired driving enforcement crackdown, "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over" round out the unofficial end of summer around Labor Day.

NHTSA’s campaign goes into effect across the country from Aug. 19 to Sept. 7.

One of the deadliest and most often committed - yet preventable - of crimes [drunk driving], has become a serious safety epidemic in our country.

While some young people believe marijuana use has little-to-no effect on driving ability, a new study found that marijuana use impairs driving similar to alcohol use. The study, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Office on National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), was released this week and published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows that during July 4th holidays from 2008-2012, 765 people lost their lives in crashes involving drivers with a BAC of .08 or more. These fatalities account for 40 percent of all motor vehicle traffic fatalities over this same five-year period. Help educate your community about the dangers of impaired driving by utilizing NHTSA’s July 4th impaired driving campaign.

Your next new car might come with all the bells and whistles…literally. Last week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and partners unveiled the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) program, a research partnership between NHTSA and an industry consortium to develop groundbreaking technology to prevent alcohol-impaired drivers from operating their vehicles while under the influence, potentially saving thousands of lives.

A new study examined the relationship between marijuana and alcohol use, finding that simultaneous users had double the odds of participating in high-risk behavior such as impaired driving, social consequences and harm to self.

Results will be published in the May 2015 online-only issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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