The new designer drug “flakka” has brought national attention to South Florida; however, the active ingredient has been detected by crime labs across the country. The drug has popped up in Texas and Ohio, as well. Use of the drug, which can be snorted, smoked, injected, and swallowed, has been linked with serious — and sometimes deadly — behavioral problems.

The drug also goes by the name "gravel" because it looks like the colorful gravel pebbles you'd use to decorate the bottom of an aquarium.

Coalition Core Essentials is an online course intended for coalition leaders, staff, volunteers, and partners. This course is based on the curriculum trained during CADCA's National Coalition Academy, though this course does not serve as a replacement for the Academy experience.

This publication provides an overview of qualitative data – how it can be used as a valid and reliable data collection process, how a coalition can engage in several qualitative data collection methodologies, and how to utilize qualitative data in all phases of the coalition problem-solving process as informed by the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) process.

Nearly two million Americans have served in military operations overseas in Iraq and Afghanistan and many more veterans live and work among us. For many veterans, the transition between military and community life can be difficult.

Veterans and military families are disproportionately affected by substance abuse, mental health issues, and family troubles. Tragic consequences like suicide, alcohol abuse and prescription drug overdose far too often plague our nation’s heroes. Community coalitions can be a key component to helping veterans in need.

During the hour-long program Supporting Those Who Serve, hear about the potential problems returning veterans face and what is available to help them. Learn how you can be part of the solution. We’ll travel to Philadelphia to see how CADCA’s VetCorps is making a difference.

This Strategizer helps clarify what constitutes “lobbying” activities for nonprofit organizations and to what extent these organizations can participate in lobbying activities in particular and the legislative process in general.

The push to close pill mills and reduce the painkiller supply is creating a new problem. Opiate addicts need their fix, so when they can’t easily get their pills to pop, they’re often turning to heroin.

In communities that are cracking down on pill mills and doctor shopping, heroin-related deaths are increasing. Experts warn that if heroin use isn’t increasing in your area yet, it’s just a matter of time.
 
During this hour-long program, “Highway to Heroin,” hear how communities are dealing with two serious drug problems at the same time. Learn how to prepare for an influx of heroin. See how partners in the Cleveland, Ohio area are working together to stop opiate abuse.

 

People Power: Mobilizing Communities for Policy Change This publication provides an overview of the steps associated with engaging in community mobilizing to implement environmental strategies with a particular emphasis on adopting alcohol, tobacco, and drug (ATD) policies at the community level.

 

 

 

 

Mark your calendar for this one-hour broadcast about transforming communities by mobilization and civic action. Understanding Your Influence. will provide you with helpful hints on how to educate local, state and national decision makers.  We’ll cover just how you can appropriately and effectively work for the changes you want to see, from local ordinances to national legislation.   Join Sue Thau, CADCA’s Public Policy consultant and other experts and learn how to become visible, vocal and, perhaps most importantly, valuable as you build relationships with policymakers.

Numbers can be overwhelming and make your head spin. It doesn’t have to be that way. Evaluating data properly can help lead you in the right direction.  CADCA can help you become an “everyday scientist” and demystify data gathering.  During the hour-long show Data Detectives learn how to investigate your local conditions to find the indicators you need to make positive change.  Find out what sources of credible local data are readily available.  See how data can help you define your substance abuse problems, select strategies and prove your effectiveness.  Master the art of using data to tell a story in the community and grow your coalition. Learn how to avoid data overload. We’ll visit Branson, MO where a coalition’s community assessment told them they had to do something about alcohol density. They did, and the results have been great. Hear what they did and how they did it. 

Think of it as an hour filled with the answers to the questions you’ve always wanted to ask about coalitions,  but haven’t. We’re going back to the basics, the fundamentals of what makes coalitions perfect vehicles for community-level change, what we need to know to be a meaningful partner of a coalition, and how we can make our coalition even more effective.

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